Following the latest act of criminal escalation by u.$. imperialism, with more than 100 cruise missiles fired into Syria as a “warning” to the Assad government, the accelerated demise of the forces holding shut the floodgates of inter-imperialist war is evermore apparent. The political machinery of imperialism alone threatens us with the next world war […]

[Leftist Critic is an independent writer, researcher, and comrade who cares about the world about them. Other than posting on radical subreddits, they also tweet infrequently at @leftistcriticabout about the murderous US empire, international solidarity with nations and peoples under attack, and provide necessary criticism of the Western “Left.” They can be reached at leftistcritic@linuxmail.org.] […]

It is no secret that the united $tates has been warming up to the possibility of a Kurdish state, primarily in Iraq and Syria (and depending how far the relationship with Turkey deteriorates, perhaps in that country as well), and has been working alongside Kurdish nationalists in Iran for decades now. Until recently they have […]

“I bid good-bye to the old century, may it rest in peace as it has lived in war. Of the new century I prophesy nothing except that it will see the decline of the British Empire. Other worse empires will rise perhaps in its place, but I shall not live to see the day. (…)” […]

1) Regardless of how the situation developed, the current civil war amounts to a proxy-conflict between decrepit US-led imperialism (represented through the US and its Arabian allies) and a developing bloc of ‘Eastern’ monopoly capital (publicly represented primarily by Russia). 2) Whether Assad or the ‘rebels’ win, a certain debt will be owed and Syria […]

Iraq 2003: U.S.A. invades based on proven-false pretenses based on Weapons of Mass Destruction. Afghanistan 1978: The U.S.A. and CIA become alarmed by the secular People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan. They start to beat the drums of “honorable, courageous freedom fighters against tyranny” and trained, armed, funded the sectarian extremist groups of the Taliban-Muhajedeen, Hisb-i-Islami, […]

From this latest news story it is clear that the U.S. is conducting its covert regime change strategy in Syria. They are in the U.S. client state of Jordan training so-called moderate leaders handpicked to replace Assad. Syria has long been a target of Amerikan-led imperialism, being one of the few countries in the region […]

Since the beginning of the unrest in Syria, “the government has said that while some protesters have legitimate grievances, the uprising is driven by militant Islamists with foreign backing.” [1] This hardly squares with the view of Western state officials and media commentators who say that an authoritarian regime is killing its people and violently suppressing a largely peaceful movement for democracy.

Who’s right?

There’s no question that there has been a longstanding Islamist opposition in Syria to Ba’athist rule. The Arab Socialist Ba’ath Party has been in power since 1963. The party’s roots are in Pan-Arabism, non-Marxist socialism, and liberation from colonialism, imperialism and religious sectarianism. Being secular, socialist (though diminishingly so) and dominated by a heterodox Shiite sect, the Alawi, Syria’s lead party has held no appeal for the Sunni majority, which has leaned toward the Muslim Brotherhood.

Neither is there any question that Islamist uprisings have become a habitual occurrence in Syria. Condemning the Alawi as heretics and resentful of the Ba’athists’ separation of Islam from the state, the Muslim Brotherhood organized riots against the government in 1964, 1965, 1967 and 1969.

On coming to power in 1970, Afiz Assad—the current president’s father– tried to overcome the Sunni opposition by encouraging private enterprise and weakening the party’s commitment to socialism, and by opening space for Islam. This, however, did little to mollify the Muslim Brothers, who organized new riots and called for a Jihad against Assad, denigrating him as “the enemy of Allah.” His “atheist” government was to be brought down and Alawi domination of the state ended. By 1977, the Mujahedeen were engaged in a guerrilla struggle against the Syrian army and its Soviet advisers, culminating in the 1982 occupation of the city of Hama. The Syrian army quelled the occupation, killing 20,000 to 30,000.

In an effort to win the Islamists’ acquiescence, Assad built new mosques, opened Koranic schools, and relaxed restrictions on Islamic dress and publications. At the same time, he forged alliances with pro-Islamic countries and organizations, including Sunni Sudan, Shia Iran, Hezbollah, Hamas and Islamic Jihad. While these measures secured some degree of calm, Islamists remained a perennial source of instability and the government was on continual guard against “a resurgence of Sunni Islamic fundamentalists.” [2]

The United States hasn’t created an opposition, but it has acted to strengthen it. US funding to the Syrian opposition began flowing under the Bush administration in 2005 [3] if not earlier. The Bush administration had dubbed Syria a member of a “junior varsity axis of evil,” along with Libya and Cuba, and toyed with the idea of making Syria the next target of its regime change agenda after Iraq. [4] Continue reading